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Dry Heat and the Effect on Your Sinuses

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Winter Sinus IssuesThere’s no doubt about it, the winter months can seem like they are never ending, especially with daylight savings time and the sometimes severe weather. Winter finds us indoors more than the summer months, exposing us to forced air heat (a leading heat-source in the United States), which can be particularly drying to our sinuses, our throats, our skin and our eyes.

Dry Sinuses

When our sinuses are dry they are more likely to cause problems for allergy sufferers and to attract bacteria that can lead to sinusitis. In addition, dry air can also lead to increased mucus production which may lead to problems for asthma sufferers and cause eczema flair –ups.

Dry Sinus Treatment

What can I do to treat and prevent dry sinuses?

  • If possible, avoid forced air (dry) heat
  • Avoid airborne inhalants such as tobacco smoke, smoke from a fireplace, hairspray, etc.
  • Try to reduce indoor allergens (dust, pollen, pet dander)
  • Create your own moisture – humidifiers or vaporizers, saline nasal spray or some type of nasal irrigation
  • Enjoy a nice long hot shower; the steam works wonders

If you are experiencing symptoms of sinusitis such as headache, postnasal drip or a discolored nasal discharge, congestion, coughing, fever and fatigue for longer than 10 days, schedule an appointment today!

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