Respected Ear, Nose, and Throat Physicians and Surgeons. Exceptional Skills.

Cutting-edge Treatments for Ear Nose, Throat, and Allergy. Snoring/Sleep Apnea, Sinusitis/Balloon Sinuplasty,
Eustachian Tube Balloon-plasty, and Tinnitus relief.

 If you are having difficulties with our patient portal, please e-mail help@healow.com  

Respected Ear, Nose, and Throat Physicians and Surgeons. Exceptional Skills.

Cutting-edge Treatments for Ear Nose, Throat, and Allergy. Snoring/Sleep Apnea, Sinusitis/Balloon Sinuplasty, Eustachian Tube Balloon-plasty, and Tinnitus relief.

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 If you are having difficulties with our patient portal, please e-mail help@healow.com  

Hearing Loss Is Common Across the Lifespan

ENT and Allergy Specialists Encourages Everyone to Learn the Signs of Hearing Loss During National Speech-Language-Hearing Month

According to new estimates, 1 in 9 Americans has hearing loss in both ears. Although hearing loss can have serious consequences when left unaddressed, it is often not prioritized as a health or quality-of-life issue. This is a reality that Talin Marino, Director of Audiology at ENT and Allergy Specialists is aiming to change this May, which is recognized as National Speech-Language-Hearing Month.

“Most of us take our hearing for granted until we start to have significant difficulties,” stated Marino. “Even then, we often don’t fully appreciate how critical our hearing is to all aspects of our lives. This May, I want to encourage everyone in the community to consider the state of their hearing—and to seek an evaluation from an audiologist if they have concerns. A variety of options are available if you discover that you have some degree of hearing loss, and audiologists can guide people through those options.”

Hearing Loss in Adults

In adults, hearing loss is increasingly common as people age. Among adults ages 35–64, roughly 9% have permanent hearing loss in both ears. That number rises to 35% for people 65–74, and 73% for adults 75 and older. These numbers increase substantially if you include mild hearing loss or people with hearing loss in only one ear.

In adults, unaddressed hearing loss is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, balance dysfunction, falls, overall medical costs, and withdrawal from social activities, leading to loneliness and depression. It can also affect one's earning potential and career growth.

Despite the benefits of treatment, adults routinely delay pursuing help with their hearing difficulties. Among adults aged 70 and older with hearing loss who could benefit from hearing aids, fewer than one in three (30%) has ever used them. Even fewer adults aged 20–69 (approximately 16%) who could benefit from wearing hearing aids have ever used them.

“We know that treatment for hearing loss has the potential to transform a person’s life,” continued Marino. “Most people have no idea how much they were missing until they get hearing aids. Beyond feeling more connected to others and more engaged in their lives, they experience numerous other benefits. A major new study has even found that U.S. adults with hearing loss who consistently wear their hearing aids have a lower risk of dying earlier compared to those who never wear them.”

As a first step, adults with questions about their hearing can take a 2-minute online hearing screening here. If the screening indicates hearing loss, or if you have other concerns about your ears and hearing, then you need more in-depth testing done by an Audiologist and Otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor) to find out the extent of hearing loss and what treatment options may be right for you.

Hearing Loss in Children

Two to three out of every 1,000 children in the United States are born with a detectable level of hearing loss in one or both ears—and almost 15% of school-aged children (6–19 years) have hearing loss in one or both ears.

When unaddressed in children, hearing loss can negatively impact their speech, language, and cognitive development—as well as their academic success, social interactions, and behavior. This is why families need to know the signs of hearing loss in children.

A variety of intervention and treatment options exist for children with any degree of hearing loss. Regardless of the approach, starting as early as possible is important so children can maximize their progress. Learn more from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.